Navarre Florida Based Commercial and Residential Landscaping Design, Installation and Maintenance
1801 Presidio Street, Navarre, FL 32566
02 Jun 2017

Your Lawn and Heavy Rains

It’s June and two things are certain – hurricane season is here and the next four months will bring us considerable rain. The 32566 zip code averages more than 27 inches of rainfall between June and September, more than 40% of our annual average total. Extended periods of heavy rain can stress your lawn and there are a few things you can do to help with recovery.

  •  Allow time after heavy rains for the water to fully absorb into the ground. Absorption will vary based on a number of factors, including rainfall totals.
  • During absorption, minimize foot traffic on your lawn as the turf is susceptible to damage.
  • Consider feeding your lawn. If the rainfall was high, it may have washed away much of the nutrients your lawn needs to thrive and fertilization can help with rebuilding strong roots.

Here are some of the things to look for following extended periods of heavy rain that might indicate lawn damage.

  • Thinning lawns
  • Dead patches
  • Discoloration
  • Noticeable wilting

If you are still not sure, call a professional for an analysis. Prestige Landscapes, LLC offers no obligation consultations and we’d love the opportunity to earn your business. Call us today (850) 393-1168

 

06 Feb 2017

Prime Your Lawn Pump (Video Tutorial)

Not sure how to prime that lawn pump you drained for the winter? Here is a short video tutorial that should get you going. If you find the pump is no longer working and in need of replacement, give us a call and we will come out and fix you up (850) 393-1168

17 Jan 2017

Choosing the right Lawn Pump

 

 

 

 

 

Did failing to winterize your lawn pump result in the need to replace? With spring right around the corner are you looking to replace an aging unit and not sure which is best for your installation? Here are a few helpful tips and a bit of information to consider before you purchase.

Lift

Lift is the distance from the water body source to the level of the highest point in your sprinkler system.

Most sprinkler pumps provide lift to 25 feet.

When determining the lift for your system, consider whether the water table drops during droughts.

Pumps are most effective with lifts to approximately 20 feet.

Criteria

Most pump manufacturers make choosing a sprinkler pump easy based on a few criteria, including lift and your sprinkler heads.

Specific criteria are:

The lift required for your system.

The number of sprinkler heads in your system.

The total length of your system’s longest pipe run.

The pipe’s diameter.

The collective capacity of the sprinkler heads in gallons per minute (GPM).

With this information, you can now refer to the chart provided by most manufacturers to determine the size of the pump you need. When deciding, also consider factors such as pump durability and the quality of the housing. Pumps housed in durable thermoplastic or cast iron tend to be most durable. Most sprinkler pumps are available in horsepower ranging from ¾ to 2 HP. A general rule of thumb is 1 HP for every acre.

If you are not comfortable with this type of DIY project, don’t hesitate to call the pros at Prestige Landscaping, Northwest Florida’s leading commercial and residential design, installation and maintenance company.

13 Sep 2016
winterizing lawn

Winterizing Northwest Florida Lawns

Clients often ask us if they really need to winterize their northwest Florida lawn. We are not surprised by the question. Most people see plants growing year-round and only an occasional hard freeze. There are certainly different views on winterizing your northwest Florida lawn – the better question to ask is probably “What does winterizing do for my lawn”.

Why is it important?

Winterizing your lawn helps the grass through the cold winter season so it can make it to spring without disease or damage. If you want that pest free, lush green lawn come spring, you need to start with a healthy root system and soil structure.

What does winterizing involve?

Most think winterizing your lawn is just about fertilization and that’s simply not the case. In addition to the application of herbicides to prevent pest development we need to look at fertilization, irrigation cycles and mowing schedules.

 Why fertilize?

Most in northwest Florida use variants of grass suited to warmer weather like Centipede, St. Augustine and Zosya. While these grasses turn dormant in winter months a fertilization program tailored to your particular variety is still recommended.

What about timing?

Generally, fertilization should be done in October. You don’t want to continue feeding your lawn when it stops growing for the season. Remember to winterize any irrigation equipment before the weather reaches the point the equipment may freeze.

Why hire a Prestige Landscapes?

We know best when to complete all the winterizing steps, what fertilizers to apply to your lawn and how much of it to use. Choosing the wrong fertilizer and applying too little or too much is one of the most common DIY mistakes made.

Prestige Landscapes offers competitive and convenient annual landscape maintenance plans. Let us handle the work and leave you to enjoy the space. Click here to set up an appointment or feel free to give us a call today.

22 Aug 2016

Planting Peach Trees in Northwest Florida

Fruit trees are a wonderful addition to your northwest Florida landscape -even the peach!

Thinking about planting fruit trees in your backyard? You might be surprised to find out deciduous trees, like the peach tree, have chilling requirements in order to flower and produce fruit – and that the panhandle of Northwest Florida, which receives the most chill units in the sates, allows for the greatest selection of fruit trees.

While our climate is great for growing fruit, we also need to consider the high disease pressure the peach tree has in the Florida panhandle, requiring a greater number of fungicide spays to produce high quality fruit and fend off diseases like mushroom root rot, peach scab, bacterial leaf spot and brown rot.

To be successful with peach trees consider the following factors when choosing a tree for planting:

  • Look for “low-chill” peach trees typically in the market from April 1 to June 1
  • Optimum chilling requirements for north Florida are 350-550 units
  • Best available varieties for north Florida: Floridadawn, Floridaking, Floridacrest and Junegold

If you like the idea of picking fresh fruit off the trees in your backyard and don’t want to bother with choosing the right variety, planting, pruning, fungicides and maintenance let the pros at Prestige Landscapes take care of the work for you. Contact us today to schedule your consultation or call us for more information.

 

03 Aug 2016

Growing Watermelon in North Florida

When planting watermelon you can plant seeds or transplants – just be careful with transplants as watermelons have sensitive roots. Look for transplants grown in peat pots that can be planted straight into the ground; this can help prevent stress to the young roots. Plant your watermelons in a location where they will receive full sun. Watermelon is versatile and it will grow in almost any type of soil as long as it’s well-drained. Your seed package should have the exact spacing needs for your particular variety. A good rule of thumb is that plants should be spaced 36 inches in rows 7 to 8 feet apart.

Watermelon plants grow best when temperatures during the day are between 70 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit, although they can handle daytime temperatures up to 90 degrees. With this in mind, the best time to plant watermelon will depend on where you are in the state. In North Florida you can plant watermelon in March and April and again in July and August.

There are a few varieties of watermelon that do particularly well in Florida. If you are planning to grow the popular icebox-sized watermelons, look for ‘Sugar Baby’ or ‘Mickeylee’ varieties. If you have the space and desire to grow larger watermelons look for ‘Jubilee’ (Florida Giant), ‘Crimson Sweet’, or ‘Charleston Grey 133’.

Watermelons take about 90 days to mature depending on the variety. It can be difficult to know when your watermelon is ready to harvest. Look for the bottom of the melon to be cream-colored or bright yellow; a white or pale green spot means the melon is not yet ripe. Check the curled tendril closest to the melon on the vine – when it turns brown and shrivels, the melon should be ripe. Harvested watermelons typically last one week when stored at room temperature, two weeks when refrigerated.

 

10 Jun 2016

Landscape Preparation for Hurricane Season

Prestige-LandscapesThe unfortunate reality that is hurricane season is upon us and on the minds of many living along the Gulf Coast. While taking care of your gardens and landscape isn’t a top priority when a named storm is headed your way, there are things you can do to protect your home and garden before a hurricane hits.

Safeguarding your garden from these weather events involves both short-term and long-term planning. Common sense and good tree care are critical in your long-term plan. Much of the damage caused to homes comes from trees that are either break apart or are uprooted during storms. Making sure your landscape features trees proven to be more wind resistant, like live oak, magnolia and bald cypress will go a long way in helping to prevent storm related damage and these trees are native to the southeast and will grow well.

Location of trees is very important. You don’t want to plant trees too close to structures or under power lines. Once planted, make sure you keep an eye on them as they grow and mature. When starting with young trees you are in the driver’s seat to ensure proper maintenance resulting in trees developed to withstand some of the forces of nature. Regularly inspect trees with an emphasis on the mature ones for structure and general health. Weak or diseased trees come with increased risk of damaging your property in the event of a storm.

When a storm is approaching and your find yourself boarding up the windows in preparation, be sure to look around your yard for any and all loose, lightweight objects small enough to be stored indoors. Pool owners should toss large objects like patio furniture in the water as it will help to keep these objects from being thrown around by the wind. If you don’t have a pool or a garage and have large objects of concern in the yard you can tie the items together and use a strong, heathy tree in the yard as an anchor.

Generally, flowers and shrubs don’t require storm prep. That said, be prepared to do some pruning and possibly replanting should you experience a storm. Small potted plants and hanging plants should be brought inside.

Following these suggestions will help prepare your garden and landscape for hurricane season and allow you to focus on what is most important – protecting your family and property. Here’s to a quite hurricane season.